Seeds,Emergency,Survival Non-GMO,Organic,Heirloom 78 Pkgs 39 DifferentVarieties

Seeds,Emergency,Survival Non-GMO,Organic,Heirloom 78 Pkgs 39 DifferentVarieties

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Video Reviews of Seeds,Emergency,Survival Non-GMO,Organic,Heirloom 78 Pkgs 39 DifferentVarieties

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  **39 DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF SEEDS, 2 PACKAGES OF EACH SEED FOR A TOTAL OF 78 PACKS OF FRESH, FRESH, FRESH  SEEDS**

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                                                     *****OVER 10,000 SEEDS***** 

ALL SEEDS ARE FRESHLEY PACKED. ALL SEEDS ARE U.S.A GROWN AND HARVESTED. ALL SEEDS ARE CERTIFIED ORGANIC, NON-GMO, NON-HYBRID AND HEIRLOOM SEEDS. ALL SEEDS HAVE A PURITY RATING OF 99%. SEEDS WILL ARRIVE PACKAGED AIRTIGHT IN INDIVIDUAL SEALED BAGS INSIDE A LARGER SEALED BAG. SEEDS WILL KEEP FOR MANY YEARS AS LONG AS THEY ARE KEPT AIRTIGHT. YOU CAN PUT IN YOUR FREEZER FOR AN INDEFINITE AMOUNT OF TIME.

The Safe Seed Pledge:

"Agriculture and seeds provide the basis upon which our lives depend. We must protect this foundation as a safe and genetically stable source for future generations. For the benefit of all farmers, gardeners and consumers who want an alternative, we pledge that we do not knowingly buy or sell genetically engineered seeds or plants. The mechanical transfer of genetic material outside of natural reproductive methods and between genera, families or kingdoms poses great biological risks, as well as economic, political and cultural threats. We feel that genetically engineered varieties have been insufficiently tested prior to public release. More research and testing is necessary to further assess the potential risks of genetically engineered seeds. Further, we wish to support agricultural progress that leads to healthier soils, genetically diverse agricultural ecosystems and ultimately healthy people and communities.

"What is GMO and why should I avoid it?

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are made by forcing genes from one species, such as bacteria, viruses, animals, or humans, into the DNA of a food crop or animal to introduce a new trait. An heirloom is generally considered something worth passing down. An heirloom seed, therefore, is seed from a plant that has been passed from one generation to another, carefully grown and saved because it is considered valuable. Many heirlooms have been grown, saved and passed down for more than 100 years. A hybrid seed is produced by artificially cross pollinating two genetically different plants of the same species, such as two different tomatoes or two varieties of corn and a seed that is saved will not grow true to either parent. Thus the farmer or gardener has no choice but to purchase new seed each year. Organic is the method by which the plant from which the seed was gathered is grown, without chemical fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, etc.

.HERE'S WHAT YOU GET:

ARUGULA

BEETS (DETROIT DARK RED) or (CHIOGGIA)

GREEN BELL PEPPERS SWEET (CALIFORNIA WONDER)

BROCCOLI (WALTHAM)

BRUSSEL SPROUTS (LONG ISLAND) or (CATSKILL)

SQUASH (SUMMER CROOKNECK)

CABBAGE (GOLDEN ACRE)

CANTALOPE (HALES BEST)

CARROT (SCARLET NANTES)

CAULIFLOWER (SNOWBALL)

CELERY (TALL UTAH)

COLLARDS (GEORGIA SOUTHERN) or (MORRIS HEADING)

BEANS (SMALL RED)

CUCUMBERS (MARKETMORE)

CORN (GOLDEN BANTAM) or (COUNTRY GENTLEMAN)

GREEN BEANS (BLUE LAKE BUSH) or (CONTENDER) or (Kentucky Wonder Pole Type)

DILL (LONG ISLAND)

EGGPLANT (BLACK BEAUTY)or (LONG PURPLE)

ZUCCHINI (BLACK BEAUTY)or (DARK GREEN)

JALAPENO PEPPERS (TAM)

CILANTRO (ORGANIC)

KALE (LACINATO)

MUSTARD GREENS

OKRA (CLEMSEN SPINELESS) or (EMERALD)

ONION (SPANISH SWEET) or(EVERGREEN WHITE BUNCHING)

PEAS (MAMMOTH MELTING SUGAR) or (WANDO) or (LITTLE MARVEL)

PINTO BEANS (ORGANIC)

PUMPKIN (JACK-O-LANTERN)

RADISH (CHERRY BELLE) or (GERMAN GIANT)

RUTABAGA (AMERICAN PURPLE TOP)

SPINACH (BLOOMSDALE)

TOMATO (RUTGERS) or (BEEFSTEAK)

TURNIP (SEVEN TOP) or (PURPLE TOP WHITE GLOBE)

ROMAINE LETTUCE (CIMMERON)

LETTUCE (LEAF OAKLEAF)

CHINESE CABBAGE (PAK or BOK CHOY)

WATERMELON (CONGO) or (JUBLIEE)

BLACK EYED PEAS (ORGANIC)

SUNFLOWER (GREY STRIPE)

  ~JUST FOR FUN~ Suggest Ideal Planting Companions For Vegetables: The following is a list of vegetables and their ideal planting companions, plus combinations to avoid: Beans-like celery and cucumbers but dislike onions and fennel. Beets are compatible with bush beans, lettuce, onions, kohlrabi, and most members of the cabbage family. Keep pole beans and mustard away from them. Cabbage, celery, dill, onions, and potatoes are good companion plants. Dislikes include strawberries, tomatoes, and pole beans. Carrots, lettuce, radish, onions, and tomatoes are friends. Dill isn’t, so plant it at the other end of the garden. Corn prefers to be near pumpkins, peas, beans, cucumbers, and potatoes. Keep tomatoes away. Cucumbers like sweet corn, peas, radishes, beans, and sunflowers. Dislikes include aromatic herbs and potatoes. Lettuce grows especially well with onions. They are also compatible with strawberries, carrots, radishes, and cucumbers. Onions can be planted near lettuce, beet root, strawberries, and tomatoes but keep well away from peas and beans. Peas, carrots, cucumbers, sweet corn, turnips, radishes, beans, potatoes, and aromatic herbs are good companions. Keep peas away from onions, garlic, leek, and shallots. Radish grows well with beetroot, carrots, spinach, parsnip, cucumbers, and beans. Avoid planting near cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, or turnips. Squash can be planted with cucumbers and corn.Tomatoes, carrots, onions, and parsley are good companion plants. Basil improves growth and flavor. Keep cabbage and cauliflower away from them.

    PLANTING INSTRUCTIONS

 


Asparagus Seeds: "Mary Washington" This perennial asparagus is an old favorite U.S. variety used in the truck garden and commercial market. Early, long, straight, dark-green spears with tight purpling tips are noted for uniform size! Delicious. Cutting season can last up to 60 days. Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow seeds outside after last frost. Soak seeds overnight, then plant seeds just under soil surface, and water.

 Dry Bean Seeds: “Pinto” These small speckled brown beans are the most popular dry shell beans for winter use! Pinto beans are commonly used in Mexican cuisine and great when used for refried beans! Young pods may also be eaten as green snap bean. 90 days to maturity. Direct sow outside after danger of last frost. Plant about 4” apart and 1“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 24”-30” apart

.  Watermelon: "Congo" This watermelon variety has one of the highest sugar contents of any watermelon! Congo produces large cylindrical fruit with blunt ends ranging in weight from 30 to 50 lbs. The rind is medium green in color with dark-green stripes and thick and tough, making this a good shipper. The high quality flesh is firm, medium red and sweet with sugar tests up to 9.5%. Resistant to Anthracnose, races 1, 2 & 3. Average water needs. This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies, and/or birds.

 Watermelon "Jubilee" In cool climates, watermelon seeds should be started indoors, but no sooner than a month before transplanting; plant three seeds per peat pot, 1/4" deep. Provide heat to keep the soil at least 80-85 degrees F. Cut off all but the strongest seedling as soon as true leaves appear, and transplant about a week after frost; put two or three plants in each hill with a 6-8' space in all directions. Gardeners in warm climates will be able to direct sow watermelons as soon as the soil temperature reaches at least 75 degrees F, planting six seeds per hill with 6-8' of space in all directions. Thin to the strongest two or three plants as soon as the seedlings appear. Watermelons should be planted in full sun and rich, loose soil. Young seedlings may benefit from black plastic to warm up the soil.

   Beet: “Detroit Dark Red” This heirloom beet is one of the most popular beets out there! Prolific, Detroit Dark Red beets mature in an average of 58 days. Roots are nearly globe shaped, 2.5 to 3 inches in diameter with smooth skin, and are blood red in color with virtually no zoning. Solid roots keep well, and are also great for canning! Medium green tops with tinges of red can be harvested early and used for salad greens. Direct sow outside as soon as the ground can be worked. Can also be fall planted. Plant about 4” apart and 1/2“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 12”-18” apart.  

Beet: "Chioggia" Chioggia heirloom beets come from the northern Italian coastal town of Chioggia, and arrived in America around 1865. Plant a full month before the last expected frost. Presoak seeds for two hours before planting to soften the hard seed coat and speed germination. Direct sow in full sun and well drained soil, placing the seeds 1/2" deep and 2-4" apart in rows 1-2' apart. Add compost or other organic matter for healthy growth, and tamp down the earth above the seeds to ensure the seed's close contact with the soil. Germination should take place in 7-14 days. For companion planting benefits, plant beets with bush beans, onions, or members of the cabbage family; avoid planting them near pole beans. 55 days to maturity, Produces 2-3" beets with alternating pink and white rings, with pink stemmed green tops.

  Cabbage: “Golden Acre” Heads of Golden Acre cabbage are firm, round, and medium green with white centers. Fast growing Cabbage variety that gives you heads that average 3 lbs. Versatile and excellent fresh or cooked! Matures in about 65 days. Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow seeds outside after last frost. Plant seeds about 1/4” under soil surface, with 24” - 30” between plants.  

Carrot: “Scarlet Nantes” This Carrot variety is very popular, and it's no wonder! Great flavor, texture, and uniformity make this one a winner! Cylindrical roots average 7” long x 1.3” in diameter. Short 10-12” tops. Bright red-orange fine-grained flesh is nearly coreless with a very sweet flavor. Colors up early for baby carrots! Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 2” apart and 1/2” below soil surface. Can sow closer, and then thin later. Rows should be spaced at 18”-24” apart.

  Radish: (German Giant) Easy to grow, edible at all stages. Very large, originates from Germany, has scarlet-red skin and crisp white, slightly pungent flesh. Harvest when marble to baseball size. Will not get woody or spongy.  Plant 1/2" deep in cold soil and up to 1 1/2" deep in warm soil. The deeper planting may also give you slightly larger roots, especially if you give them a slightly wider spacing. Spacing is critical when growing radishes. If they are overcrowded they won't produce good roots. Thinning is recommended if plants seem overcrowded. Plant in the early spring when days are still short. Make shallow (1/2˝ to 1 1/2˝) furrows. Sow the seeds 1/2" to 1" apart. Bigger seed may also result in larger roots. Sow directly outdoors, as it germinates easily in cold soil and the plants grow rapidly.  

  Corn: “Golden Bantam” One of the first yellow sweet corns, this old heirloom is full of sweet flavor. Not only is it early, it's delicious! Also great for freezing, even freezes well on the cob. Ready in 80 days. Direct sow outside after danger of last frost. Plant about 4” apart and 1” below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 30”-36” apart

Corn: "Country Gentleman"  Country Gentleman corn, a heirloom variety, is the most well known variety of shoepeg corn. Named for the similarity of its kernels to wooden pegs used in shoe making, shoepeg corn is characterized by small, irregular white kernels of unsurpassed tenderness and sweetness. The American South has made this type of corn its own, and it is virtually unrecognized in other areas of the United States. Country Gentleman was first offered for sale in 1890. Prepare the soil with compost or other organic matter. One week after frost or when the soil consistently reaches 60 degrees F, plant the corn 1" deep and 8-12" apart. Planting blocks of four short rows ensures good pollination. 90 days. Produces 7-8" ears with irregular white kernels.

  CUCUMBER: "MARKETMORE" Developed by Dr. Munger of Cornell University. MARKETMORES produces 8"-9" long fruits varying in diameter from 2"-2 ?". Dark green even in hot weather with a sweet mild flavor. Plant cucumbers in hills or mounds with plenty of added organic matter. Sow 6-7 seeds in a hill, thinning to the 3 best vines. In cool regions, start seeds indoors 10-14 days before the last frost, or sow seeds directly when the soil is at least 70F. Plant seeds 18" apart if trellised or 36" apart if left to sprawl. Days To Maturity: 58-75 Days Sun/Shade: Full Sun

   Dill: “Mammoth Long Island Dill” is used as a pickling spice, food flavoring, and garnish. Leaves can be dried for later use. Grows a little taller than Bouquet with sparser foliage and is more green (slightly less blue-green) in color. Higher yields and earlier maturity than other varieties. Considered the best variety for pickling! Attractive to bees, butterflies, and/or birds. Average water needs. Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow seeds outside after last frost. Plant seeds just under soil surface, and water.

Rhubarb Seeds: "Victoria"  This heirloom variety of rhubarb comes from horticultural expert Joseph Myatt of Manor Farm in Deptford, England. Mr. Myatt introduced Victoria rhubarb in 1837, to honor England's beloved queen; rhubarb immediately became an extremely popular dessert inspiration in the fashionable circles of Britain. The Victoria rhubarb strain, which soon made its way across the ocean, is also responsible for the American culinary tradition of rhubarb. About two months before the last expected spring frost, start the rhubarb seeds indoors. Soak them for several hours then plant two seeds per peat pot; keep them warm until germination, then clip off the weaker seedling. When the outdoor temperature reaches an average of 45 degrees F and no lower than 32 degrees F at night, transplant the seedlings. Plant them 3-4' apart in rich soil and full sun. Avoid harvesting rhubarb in its first year of growth, to allow the plant to develop full strength and maturity. Harvest lightly in the second year and fully in the third year. To harvest the stalks, grip the stalk near its base and give it a twisting pull. Removing the entire stalk rather than cutting it actually allows for new stalks, increasing production; this method also prevents rot and disease from developing. Keep in mind that the leaves of rhubarb are mildly poisonous. Perennial. 1-2 years. 24-30" height. 36-48" spacing

  Kale: “Siberian” is a very hard kale with exceptional flavor that's improved by a light frost! This variety's appearance is attractive with its frilly leaves and blue-green color. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 6”-12” apart and 1/4“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 18”-24” apart

.Kale: “ Lacinato”  Grown in Italy since the 18th century, and at Monticello by Jefferson! Grow the same delectable kale that has been a mainstay of Italian cuisine and international fine dining since the 1700's! Lacinato Kale (also known as Dinosaur Kale, Tuscan Kale, and even Flat Black Cabbage!) is an heirloom variety that delivers the best tasting leaves you will ever eat, all on vigorous, high-yielding plants that love a little frost. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 6”-12” apart and 1/4“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 18”-24” apart.

“Butterhead” Lettuce: A light green butterhead with delicious buttery yellow heart. This extra tender heirloom has a classic mild flavor, and goes back over 100 years. The firm, 12-inch round head sits up off the ground for a cleaner pick. Ready in about 70 days, does well in warm conditions. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 12”-18” apart and 1/8“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 18”-24” apart.

    Onion: ”Sweet Spanish” These long-day onions are large, sweet and mild with good storage quality. Let them grow up to a pound, or harvest small as scallions. Mature at 110 days. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 4” apart and 1/2“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 12”-18” apart.

  Onion: "Evergreen White Bunching Onion" Organic, heirloom. Most likely coming from Asia, this unusual onion has a different name in nearly every country that cultivates it; spring onions, scallions, green onions to name only a few. The countries of eastern Asia remain on the top of the list for bunching onion production. Plant the seeds 1/4" deep in a flat 2-3 months before the last frost date; keep the soil moist and at room temperature. When the tops begin to flop over, cut them off to 3" to focus the growing on the roots. Four weeks before the last frost or when the soil reaches at least 50 degrees F, transplant the seedlings 3" apart in rows 12" apart. For direct sowing, sow three seeds per inch 1/4" deep in light, rich soil and full sun. Perennial. 70 days.

Peas: "Mammoth Melting Sugar" This tall heirloom pea variety does well on trellises and bears large pods for a long time! The stringless pods of Mammoth Melting Sugar peas are tender and remain sweet longer than most varieties! Vines grow 4 to 6 feet tall and pods are 4 to 5 inches long. Matures in 65 to 70 days. Average water needs.

  Peas: “Wando” Wando was released in 1943 with much fanfare because unlike many peas it tolerates heat. And is drought resistant compared to other peas. A very reliable homestead pea. Used to sow late in the season to extend you pea harvest. Excellent type for Southern gardeners. Still performs well in cool temps .Vines are 24-32" tall, bearing 3-4" pods filled with 6-8 dark-green peas. Excellent freezer variety. Direct sow in average soil in full sun in early spring for first crop, in late summer for fall crop. Sow seeds 2" apart in double rows spaced 6" apart with 24" between each set of rows. Cover with 2" of fine soil. Support shorter peas on small stakes or a pea fence, or taller kinds on a pea tower or trellis netting. Seedlings emerge in 7-14 days. Mature in 70 days.

     Green Bell Pepper: “The California Wonder” is a very popular vegetable for the home garden! Glossy deep-green turning red at full maturity, these peppers reach 4” x 4” diameter. This variety grows on upright ever-bearing plants 24 to 26” tall. Mild, sweet flavor. Mature in approximately 75 days. This plant has average water needs, water regularly, but do not overwater. Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow.  Plant seeds about 1/4” under soil surface, then transplant seedlings to garden with 12” - 18” between plants, and 24” to 36” between rows.

    Radish: “Cherry Belle” is the most popular open pollinated round red radish variety! Reaching up to 1 ½ inches in diameter with crisp firm-white flesh, this variety is fast growing. Resistant to pithiness. Matures in 20 to 30 days. A great vegetable to grow in your garden and serve fresh in salads! Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 2” apart and 1/2” below soil surface. Can sow closer, and then thin later. Rows should be spaced 18” apart.

     Tomato: “Rutgers” are a smaller (12-14 ounces), globe-shaped variety created in the 1930s to produce a tasty, hearty, and versatile fruit. The plant is an indeterminate grower that typically does not grow higher than around 36", needing 70-80 days to reach maturity Direct sow seeds  1/2" deep in a well-drained soil.  Seeds require warm soil between roughly 65-90 degrees F. Warmer soils will promote faster germination. Keep soil moist, but not soggy while awaiting germination. Moderate watering slightly once seedlings break through the soil.

Tomato: "Beefsteak" Beefsteak tomatoes, aptly named large, thickly fleshed fruits, are one of the favorite tomato varieties for the home garden. Growing beefsteak tomatoes requires a heavy cage or stakes to support the often 1-pound fruits. Beefsteak tomato varieties are late maturing and should be started indoors to extend the growing period. The beefsteak tomato plant produces classic slicing tomatoes that your family will love. Seed expert Peter Henderson introduced this tomato in 1894, naming it "Henderson's Crimson Cushion." Later renamed Beefsteak, it became a favorite of gardeners in the Northeast. Direct sow seeds 1/2" deep in a well-drained soil. Seeds require warm soil between roughly 65-90 degrees F. Warmer soils will promote faster germination. Keep soil moist, but not soggy while awaiting germination. Moderate watering slightly once seedlings break through the soil. Or you can start tomatoes indoors 6-8 weeks before the last frost of spring, sowing the seeds in a flat 1/4" deep and 1" apart. Keep the temperature at 70-75 degrees F until germination, as well as providing adequate light in a sunny window or under a grow light; keep the soil moist, but make sure drainage is adequate. When the second set of leaves emerges, transplant the seedlings into individual pots; bury the stems up to the lowest set of leaves to grow strongly rooted plants. A week before planting the seedlings outside, begin exposing them to the weather during the day to harden them; tomatoes cannot endure cold weather, and should not be transplanted outside until all threat of frost has passed. When the soil temperature reaches at least 70 degrees F. 85 days.

    Cantaloupe: “Hales Best Jumbo” is one of the most popular open pollinated melon varieties. Great for the home vegetable garden! A standard early shipper with heavy coarse net and light ribs. Melons average 4 pounds and are packed with firm, salmon colored, great tasting flesh! Direct sow outside after danger of last frost. Plant in hills of 2-3 plants per hill at 60”-72” apart, and 1“below soil surface.

    Spinach: “Bloomsdale” is spinach that may very well become your favorite! The large eaves of this variety are thick, dark green, and have a crinkled texture. Slow to bolt, this is a great choice for late spring and summer plantings! Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 2” apart and 1/2“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 12”-18” apart.

    Broccoli: “Waltham 29” Waltham is a great cool-climate Broccoli variety that produces nice, medium-sized heads and a fine crop of side shoots! Plants average 24 inches. Non-uniform in maturity resulting in a long harvest period ideal for the home vegetable garden! Easy to grow and delicious. 85 days to maturity. Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow seeds outside after last frost. Plant seeds about 1/4” under soil surface, with 24” - 30” between plants.

     Cauliflower: “Snowball Y Improved” is a self-blanching cauliflower strain that needs no tying! Smooth white heads with smooth curds reach 6-7”. Used for fall and winter harvest and for both fresh market and freezing! Reliable, heavy yielding and high quality! Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow seeds outside after last frost. Plant seeds about 1/4” under soil surface, with 24” - 30” between plants.

    Celery: “Tall Utah” Popular and widely adapted, Tall Utah celery plants grow to 30” tall and produce long smooth stalks with crisp, tender texture. Good heart development, strong roots and good disease tolerance. Plants will bolt in cold weather. Approximately 100 days to maturity. Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow seeds outside after last frost. Plant seeds about 1/8” under soil surface, with 12” between plants and 24” - 30” between rows.

    “Georgia Southern” Collard Greens (75 days) First released in 1879. Georgia Southern is a very old standard variety that is still very popular in the south.  Georgia Southern Collards are a deep blue/green color that really stands out in your garden. Georgia Southern Collard is a slow to bolt, non-heading type of collard that grows 2-3 feet. Leaves are tasty, tender, mild and juicy.  Most folks strip the leave portions off of the stems for a tastier collard green. Sow seeds 1/4 inch deep in spring, 4 weeks before the last expected frost. Space seedlings 1 foot apart in rows 3 feet apart. For a fall crop, broadcast seed 8 to 10 weeks before the first expected frost; thin to 12 inches apart.    

Mustard Seeds: “Southern Giant Curled” mustard's mild flavor is best in cool weather, and a great addition to your vegetable garden and your salad! Delicious when cooked like spinach! Large, fast-growing plants have good resistance to bolting and produce big, frilled, green leaves. Good resistance to cold weather. First harvest is 45 days after sowing. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 4” apart and 1/4“below soil surface. Can sow closer, and then thin later. Rows should be spaced at 24” apart.

  Okra: “Clemson Spineless” is, by far, the most popular variety of okra on the market! Vigorous 3-5’ plants produce uniform, straight pods that are spineless, making harvest easier! Can be served fried, cooked, or pickled. Very prolific and high yielding, maturing in 48-60 days. Direct sow outside about 2 weeks after last frost. Plant about 12” apart, and 1/4“below soil surface. Rows should be about 24” to 36” apart .  

  Okra: "Emerald" okra was developed by the Campbell Soup Company, and introduced in 1950. Originally, however, okra comes from northern Africa, where it still grows wild. This unusual member of the hibiscus family still has an important part in African and Mediterranean cuisine, as well as being a culinary tradition in the American South. Okra loves heat, so gardeners with short growing seasons may need to start their seed indoors; plan to set them out 3-4 weeks after the last frost. Before planting the seeds, soak them overnight to encourage faster germination. Plant 2-3 seeds in one peat pot, and keep them at 80-90 degrees F until germination; thin to the strongest plant by cutting off the rest. When the air temperature reaches a consistent 60 degrees F, plant the seedlings in full sun 12-15" apart in rows 3' apart. For direct sowing in warmer climates, sow the seed 3/4" deep and later thin the plants to 12-15" apart. 55 days.

 Hot Pepper Seeds: “Jalapeno Tam” The Jalapeno M matures in 70 to 75 days. Sausage-shaped fruits average 3.5" x 1.5” and are very pungent dark green fruits that are slow to turn red. Upright dark green plants grow from 26" to 36" tall and will continue producing over an extended period of time, making this an excellent choice for the home garden! A very popular seasoning in Mexican and American cuisine! Great for raw or pickled eating! SHU of 3,500 to 6,000. Average water needs. Water regularly, but do not over water. Sow seeds indoors before last frost. Plant seeds about 1/4” under soil surface, then transplant seedlings to garden with 12” - 18” between plants, and 24” to 36” between rows.

     Rutabaga: “American Purple Top” This vegetable is great for winter storage! American Purple Top rutabagas produce large, round, yellow roots with a purple crown. Fine flavored flesh is firm and sweet and turns orange when cooked. This easy to grow variety matures in approximately 90 days. Self-sows freely and may be invasive, deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings. This plant requires consistently moist soil, and is attractive to bees, butterflies, and/or birds. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 4” apart and 1/4“below soil surface. Can sow closer, and then thin later. Rows should be spaced at 18”-24” apart.

    Turnip: “Seven Top”  Heirloom Seven Top Turnip is grown for its nutritious greens not the roots like most turnips.  The tender leaves of Seven Top Turnip can be harvested in about 30 days, 4"-6" for salads and stir-fries, or for big greens 12"-18" harvested in about 60 days.  Seven Top Turnip is a fast growing pre-1800 variety.. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 4” apart and 1/4“below soil surface. Can sow closer, and then thin later. Rows should be spaced at 18”-24” apart.  

  Dill: “Mammoth Long Island Dill” is used as a pickling spice, food flavoring, and garnish. Leaves can be dried for later use. Grows a little taller than Bouquet with sparser foliage and is more green (slightly less blue-green) in color. Higher yields and earlier maturity than other varieties. Considered the best variety for pickling! Attractive to bees, butterflies, and birds. Average water needs. Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow seeds outside after last frost. Plant seeds just under soil surface, and water.

  BRUSSEL SPROUTS: “Long Island Improved”  HEIRLOOM. Miniature cabbage-like heads are tasty and nutritious. Lots of tasty sprouts on short, self-supporting stems. The semi-dwarf plants are stocky with leaves closely spaced, so there are lots of tasty, 1 inch closely packed sprouts on the short, self-supporting stems on a 24 inch high plant. Heavy set of firm sprouts over a long season. Good freezer. Don't overlook this popular vegetable for your garden. For an early crop start seeds indoors in the earliest part of spring. Or direct sow seeds outdoors in Spring after last frost. Cover seed with 1/8 inch fine soil. For a later fall-winter crop, sow seeds directly outdoors or start indoors by midsummer. Keep soil moderately moist during germination. Harvest in 90 days.

BRUSSELL SPROUTS: "Catskill"  Historians believe that the ancient Romans first cultivated Brussels sprouts, but Belgium has the greatest claim on this tiny vegetable. As the name indicates, Brussels sprouts grew in great abundance around the city of Brussels. Since the 1900s, growers in California has produced most of the United States' supply of Brussels sprouts. The Catskill variety comes from Arkport, New York, where seed expert Arthur White developed them in 1941.

Catskill Brussel Sprouts Germination: Since frost brings out the best flavor in brussel sprouts, plant them late in May or early in June for a fall crop. Start the seeds by planting them 1/2" deep in soil; when they grow to 6" tall, transplant or thin them 2' apart. Compress the soil around the seed and keep the ground moist.

  Arugula: Plant this variety in your herb garden and use its greens to add spicy/non-bitter flavor to your salads, sandwiches, and other recipes! Young leaves can be used fresh, and mature leaves can be cooked. This plant is quite hardy. Sow successive plantings for harvest all the way through summer! 35 to 55 days to maturity. Direct sow seeds outside after last frost. Plant seeds just under soil surface, and water.

 

  Leaf Lettuce Seeds: “Oakleaf” lettuce produces nice, tight rosettes of green, deeply lobed oak leaf shaped leaves. Tender and crisp! It has very good resistance to hot weather – never bitter! Harvest baby leaves in 28 days and full size leaves in 50 days. Average water needs. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 1/2” to 1” apart and 1/8“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 12”-18” apart.

   Pak Choi: is a Chinese vegetable variety that is grown for a multitude of uses. It can be used at many different stages for additions to soups, salads, and meats, etc. The heads have thick, white ribs, and is also called “Bok Choy” in some locations. Matures in approximately 50 days.  Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow seeds outside after last frost. Plant seeds about 1/4” under soil surface, with 24” - 30” between plants

. Romaine Lettuce Seeds: “Cimmaron” An old heirloom lettuce variety, Cimmaron produces loose, leafy heads of gorgeous red lettuce. Conical heads grow 10-12” tall, full of superb flavor and crisp, tender texture. Very resistant to bolting! Popular baby leaf variety – 30-35 days. Full sized leaves – 60 days. Average water needs. Water regularly, but don't over water. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 18”-24” apart and 1/8“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 18”-24” apart.

   Butterhead Lettuce Seeds: "Little Gem" This heirloom butterhead resembles a miniature romaine, no more then eight inches tall. One of the earliest to mature, and one of the best tasting. Also heat tolerant, and ready in only 50 days. Lettuce grows well in cool weather, so the first crop can be direct sown when the soil temperature reaches at least 35 degrees F, or as soon as the soil can be worked. If the soil temperature rises above 75 degrees F, the seeds become dormant. Direct sow the seed in rich soil and full sun, spreading them as thinly as possible in rows 1-2' apart; when the seedlings begin to grow, thin them to a distance of 8-12". Succession crops can be grown for fresh lettuce all season in areas with cool summers or warm winters; this is accomplished by planting a new crop every 2 weeks.

  Endive Seeds: “Green Curled Ruffec” This heirloom variety produces deeply cut dark-green leaves in loose heads which blanche to cream in the center. Adds great crisp texture to salads and beautiful appearance adds character to your garden! Very hardy and resistant to cold wet weather. Flavor actually improves after light frost! Matures 75 to 100 days after sowing. Sow seeds indoors before last frost, or direct sow seeds outside in early spring. Plant seeds about 1/4” under soil surface, with 12” between plants, and 18” to 24” between rows.

  Mustard Seeds: “Southern Giant Curled” mustard's mild flavor is best in cool weather, and a great addition to your vegetable garden and your salad! Delicious when cooked like spinach! Large, fast-growing plants have good resistance to bolting and produce big, frilled, green leaves. Good resistance to cold weather. First harvest is 45 days after sowing. Direct sow outside in early spring. Can be fall planted. Plant about 4” apart and 1/4“below soil surface. Can sow closer, and then thin later. Rows should be spaced at 24” apart.

  Green Beans “Contender”: First offered to gardeners in 1949, Contender comes from a high yielding, disease resistant strain. Direct sow seeds in rich, well drained soil in full sun at least a week after the last expected frost, since beans are quite sensitive to cold. Plant them 1" deep and 3-6" apart, in rows about 2' apart; press down the earth above them for good soil contact. These seeds rot easily in wet soil, so do not over water them. Germination should take place 7-10 days after planting.

Dry Bean Seeds: “Small Red” These plants supply big yields of small, spicy flavored beans, usually used for dry bean. One of the best for chili! Matures in 95 days. Direct sow outside after danger of last frost. Plant about 4” apart and 1“below soil surface. Rows should be spaced at 24”-30” apart.

  Zucchini: “Black Beauty” An All-American Selection. A zucchini squash that is delicious when sliced and served fresh, fried, steamed or simmered. A very popular variety of summer squash. Plants are compact and easy to grow, producing an abundance of delicious fruit which is continually produced until frost. Constant cutting of fruit will yield a heavy crop. Dark green, glossy fruits with creamy white flesh are long, straight & slender. Firm, very tender, good flavor. The fruits grow 10-12 inches long and 3-1/2 inches wide at maturity. Direct sow after all danger of frost has passed and the soil has warmed to 60 degrees. Plant 4 to 5 seeds in moist hills 1" deep, spacing the hills 36" to 48" apart. Thin Zucchini seedlings down to 2 or 3 of the most vigorous growers when the plants are several inches tall. Avoid watering if possible to prevent the seed from rotting. After germination water as needed.

  Black Eyed Peas: are susceptible to cold, and will not tolerate frost. They should be sown after the last frost of the season, and can be started indoors 4-6 weeks beforehand. Black-eyed peas can be harvested as either a snap bean at approximately 60 days after germination, or as a dry bean after about 90 days.

      Green Beans: “Blue Lake” Are the classic bean most people think of when you think of a green bean. Known in the canning industry for years because of its reliability, huge yields, disease resistance and its ability to bear all at once making canning a much easier task. Blue Lake produces plump, tender, dark green pods that are about 5 1/2" long. The bush itself only grows about 16" saving space in your garden, but producing big juicy yields. This is THE green bean for canning or freezing. Sow the seeds 1 inch deep, about 6 inches apart, in rows 18 inches apart. Beans do not do well in a wide row planting. They must have room on either side for maximum production. Plant after all danger of frost has past. Do not plant too soon! If the soil has not warmed sufficiently, the seeds will rot in the ground before they germinate.

  Squash: "Winter Vegetable Spaghetti"  The Burpee Seed Company introduced this variety to the United States in 1936; most World War II Victory Gardens contained this squash, more commonly known as spaghetti squash. Gardeners with short growing seasons may want to start their squash seeds indoors a month before the last expected frost. Since squashes do not take well to transplanting, peat pots are the best option. Plant two seeds per pot, later clipping off the weaker seedling. Harden the seedlings by exposing them to the weather for several hours at a time during the week before transplanting. About a week after the last frost or when the soil temperature reaches an average of 60 degrees F, plant the seedlings in very rich soil 8-10' apart in rows 10-12' apart. Another option is to plant the seedlings in hills of two, 8-10' apart. To direct sow, plant the seeds a week after frost 1/2" deep, 3-4' apart and thin to 8-10' apart. 90 days.  18-24" height. 4-6' spacing. Produces oval, cream colored squashes that average 5-7 lbs.

Cilantro: The coriander plant, whose leaves are known as cilantro, is native to the Mediterranean and Middle Easter countries; it is believed to be one of the earliest spices used by man. Early physicians such as Hippocrates used coriander primarily as an aromatic stimulant or to disguise the taste of unsavory medicines. Nearly every part of this herb has a culinary use; in Thai cuisine, the roots flavor spicy sauces, while the cilantro leaves season and garnish Chinese, Vietnamese, and Mexican dishes. The coriander seed is used in candy, specialty breads, sauces, desserts, and even perfumes. In Tudor England, coriander seeds coated with sugar were known as "comfits" and became a popular treat. Gardeners in warm climates may have the best success with coriander by planting it at any time from September through February, since it is a cool weather plant. It can also be planted as soon as possible in the spring, or after the heat of summer as a fall crop. Since this herb does not take transplanting well, direct sow the seeds 1/2" deep in rows 18-20" apart; thin the seedlings to 12" apart as soon as they develop leaves.

  Summer Squash: “Summer Crookneck” Summer Crookneck is a popular early variety that is great for the home vegetable garden or market! Holds and ships well. Bush type plants produce wanted light-yellow curve-necked fruits with creamy-white flesh, with a good buttery flavor! Generally used at the 5-6" stage. Matures in about 50 days. Average water needs. Attractive to bees, butterflies, and birds. Direct sow outside after danger of last frost. Plant in hills of 2-3 plants per hill at 36”-48” apart, and 1“below soil surface.                          

Eggplant: "Black Beauty" is a popular heirloom variety of eggplant with big yields! Bushy spreading plants grow up to 30 inches and hold their purplish-black oval fruit well off the ground, keeping it nice and clean! High quality fruit averages 2 pounds, holds well and retains good color. 72-85 days to maturity. Average water needs. This variety is suitable for growing in containers.

 Eggplant "Organic Long Purple"  Seeds: Eggplant thrives in the full heat of summer; row covers, black plastic, or other methods to conserve heat may be necessary in some climates. If temperatures threaten to fall below 55 degrees F, cover the plants. As soon as the seedlings become established, mulch them to conserve moisture and control weeds. Keep the soil evenly moist.  Though gardeners with long growing seasons will be able to direct sow their eggplant seed when the soil reaches 70 degrees F, starting the seed indoors is best in most areas. About 8-10 weeks before the last expected spring frost, plant the seeds in pots 1/4" deep. Keep them in a sunny window or under a grow light, maintaining a temperature of around 80 degrees. Germination of eggplant can be spotty, and may take several weeks. Keep the seedlings moist and provide organic matter for the best development. Gradually expose them to the elements by leaving the pots outdoors during the day. When the average air and soil temperature reach 70 degrees, or about 3 weeks after the last frost, plant the seedlings in well drained soil in full sun; for fullest growth, allow each plant 2-3' in all directions. 75 days

Jack O Lantern Pumpkin: Early pumpkins, actually a form of squash, come from early Native American gardens. Native Americans grew these vegetables as part of the "three sisters" group comprised of beans, corn, and squash, since they provide mutual benefits. Pumpkins and squash became a valuable food source for the settlers of the New World. To direct sow, plant the seeds a week after frost 1/2" deep, 3-4' apart and thin to 8-10' apart. For companion planting benefits, plant pumpkins along with corn but avoid planting them with potatoes. 100 days. 120 seeds per oz. 18-24" height. 8-10' spacing. Produces rounded, orange, slightly ribbed pumpkins averaging 8-12 lbs.

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